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About the Manuscripts Indexed


Aberystwyth, Llyfryell Genedlaethol Cymru (National Library of Wales), 20541 E (The " Penpont Antiphoner")

Antiphoner (Sarum Use) prepared for a non-monastic church in Wales, probably in the diocese of St. David's. Mid-fourteenth century (ca. 1320-1390). Quadratic staff notation. Cathedral cursus. Several lacunae. 324 folios.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-157: Temporale. 1r, Christmas (sections in the beginning and middle are missing); 8v, Stephen; 20v, Thomas Becket; 28v, Hours of the Virgin; 32r, Epiphany; 40r, Ferial Office; 57r, Septuagesima (large section is missing); 79r, Passion Sunday (third week of Lent, fourth Sunday and week of Lent, and part of Passion Sunday are missing); 87r, Holy Thursday (beginning is missing); 95v, Easter; 120v, Pentecost; 131r, Corpus Christi (end is missing); 134r, Summer Histories (brief section of Kings missing); 150r, Sundays after Pentecost; 155v, Dedication of a Church (incomplete).
Ff. 158-176: Psalter with music (incomplete). 159v, Matins psalms and antiphons (end of Feria 6, Saturday); 165r, Second Vespers psalms and antiphons (Sunday to Saturday, part of Feriae 4-6 missing). 171v, Canticles and other texts.
Ff. 177-300: Sanctorale. 177r, Andrew; 187r, Fabian and Sebastian (lacuna after second nocturn of Matins); 189r, Agnes (fragmentary); 189v, Vincent; 197v, Purification (lacuna after Lauds); 202r, Agatha (fragmentary); 205r, Dewi (or David); lacuna; 209r, Annuntiation (partial Matins only); lacuna; 210r, Philip and James; 215r, John the Baptist (lacuna after part of Lauds); 218r, John and Paul; 219v, Peter and Paul (some of Matins missing in lacuna); 233v, Finding of Stephen (most of Matins lost in lacuna); 235r, Laurence; 258v, Feast of Relics; 262v, Matthew; 270v, Denis (Matins missing in lacuna); 272r, Virgin Martyrs of Cologne; 279r, All Souls' Day (Office for the Dead); 283v, Leonard of Noblac; 297r, Catherine of Alexandria.
Ff. 301-324: Commons (extremely fragmentary).
One group of folios near the end of the manuscript is misbound. The correct order is as follows: 236, 238, 237, 240, 239, 241. In the index, these folios have been renumbered in order to restore the correct order of chants; sorting on the numbers in the "Marginalia" field will restore the misbound order of the folios in the manuscript. The ordering of these folios is also corrected in the facsimile reproduction of the Penpont Antiphoner. There is a detailed codicological analysis of the manuscript in the introduction to that work.

The numbering of the differentiae in this index follows that of the Sarum Tonale (published by Frere in The Use of Sarum ). In it, as here, the tonus peregrinus is assigned to mode 8 differentia 5. Six of the differentiae in the "Penpont" antiphoner are indicated by pitches or neumations that are slightly different from those in the Sarum Tonale: these are 1.8, 2.2, 3.2, 3.3, 3.5, and 4.2. In addition, two differentiae (4.9 and 7.7) that appear in the Sarum Tonale are lacking in the "Penpont" antiphoner. One differentia in "Penpont," 2.3, appears to be a variant of either 2.1 or 2.2, but it is impossible to determine which. This differentia is not in the Sarum Tonale.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned a number prefixed by "pen."

Selected Bibliography
Edwards, Owain Tudor. Matins, Lauds, and Vespers for St. David's Day. Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 1990.
Frere, Walter Howard, ed. The Use of Sarum, II. The Ordinal and Tonale. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1901.
National Library of Wales MS. 20541 E: The Penpont Antiphonal. With an Introduction by Owain Tudor Edwards. Publications of Mediaeval Musical Manuscripts, No. 22 (Facsimile Reproduction of the Manuscript). Ottawa: The Institute of Mediaeval Music, 1997.

The computer index was prepared by Owain Tudor Edwards, Professor Emeritus (retired, 2008) of Music History at the Norwegian State Academy of Music, Oslo. It was revised and expanded at The Catholic University of America by Keith Glaeske, Charles Downey, and Lila Collamore.

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Albi, Bibliothèque municipale Rochegude, 44

Gradual and antiphoner of the canons’ cursus; dated ca. 890; from the cathedral of Sainte-Cécile in Albi. 125 fols.; 225 x 165 mm. Mostly unnotated, but some non-diastematic Aquitanian neumes with significative letters. There are lacunae in the manuscript after folios 72, 73, and 121. The end of the manuscript is missing. 68r-72v consist of a substitute gathering, preceded by an unnumbered folio after 67 (67 bis), which is numbered 67w (recto) and 67x (verso) in the index.

About the Antiphoner

This manuscript, along with the Compiègne Antiphoner (Paris, BN lat. 17436), is one of only two ninth-century sources for the chants of the Divine Office that are relatively complete. Like the Compiègne Antiphoner, it contains the unnotated texts of the chants. Melisma gaps at the beginning of the gradual of Albi 44 suggest that the manuscript may have been originally planned to be notated, a plan later abandoned. In the antiphoner, about a dozen chants contain some musical notation: only one chant is notated in its entirety. Albi 44 has been dated by John Emerson to ca. 890, on the basis of the contents and paleographical and codicological similarities of this manuscript to other sources copied at the old stone cathedral of Sainte-Cécile in Albi at that time. The manuscript lacks any distinctive local saints, and thus the church for which it was copied is unknown. The anthology style of the manuscript is typical of antiphoners of early date: most chants are arranged in series by genre rather than by precise liturgical position. For example, the antiphons for the Sundays after Pentecost are presented in two series, the second labeled “de Apostolorum,” and although they are more-or-less in order by Sunday (as can be determined from the Gospel texts), this ordering breaks down in several places. Likewise, the responsories for the Easter season are grouped into three sets: on Easter Sunday, on the Octave of Easter, and before Ascension (“De Psalmis, TP”). Rubrics are inconsistently provided and often added between lines. It is clear that this was a manuscript that was intended to be used by someone who was thoroughly familiar with the Office. Two series of antiphons, on Epiphany (068v13) and the Octave of Epiphany (069r07), have the rubric “ad fontes vel ad crucem” and may be intended as either processional or stational antiphons. A procession to the baptismal font here may indicate that baptism took place on Epiphany in this church. There is no mention of the font during Triduum, Easter, or Pentecost. In its present state, the manuscript can be very difficult to read due to deterioration of the ink. This is a problem especially at the end of the manuscript.

About the Index

This index was prepared from the edition of the text of Albi 44 by John Emerson, and the edition numbers are entered in the “Extra” field (see the File Description) with the prefix “e” for “Emerson.” For purposes of electronic sorting in the index, leading zeros are given for these numbers (e.g. e0001, e0002 etc.). In the Emerson edition, verses of responsories and antiphons take the same edition number as their respond or antiphon. Likewise, a few items were added at a late stage in the edition and given duplicate edition numbers (in the edition 250 bis, 952 bis, 960 bis, 976 bis, 1130 bis). Similarly, two antiphons have been listed in the index that appear only as rubrics in the edition (items e0960, e0977). These items are all listed under the edition number of the previous item, which will present no problems for the user in finding them.

Due to the differences in the nature of a text edition and a CANTUS index, this index differs from the information provided in the edition in a number of places. CAO numbers are assigned according to CANTUS principles, and not according to Emerson’s critical notes. Thus, texts that are provided with a CAO correspondence in the edition may appear as non-CAO chants in the index. Chants not found in CAO are assigned numbers beginning with “alb.” Similarly, liturgical position is more narrowly defined in the index than in the edition. Also, the Latinity of the manuscript is highly irregular. As in all CANTUS indices, spelling is standardized, but the grammar and word-order of the original is retained. Users will need to refer to the edition for the form of the text found in the manuscript. Thus, the office designation “E” (“in evangelio”) is used freely in the index, as it is in the manuscript, for groups of antiphons after Lauds or Vespers to be used with either the Benedictus of Lauds or the Magnificat of Vespers (and probably also including some antiphons for general use as well). Three Lauds offices (Purification, and the two offices for Septuagesima: items 070v06, 071r09, and 075r06) are listed with six antiphons for the psalms. This is because it proved impossible to determine which one of these six (if any) represented a duplicate for one of the psalms. Two other differences from the edition should be mentioned: in the edition, Hodie scietis (item e0183, 063r16) is regarded as of uncertain genre—either an antiphon or a versicle. In the index, this chant is listed as a versicle for vespers, as specified by the rubric. In the edition, "Venite adoremus" (item e1986, 124v32) is regarded as the incipit of the invitatory psalm: "Venite exsultemus." For the index, a decision was made that this was in fact the second half of the invitatory antiphon itself: “Regem cui omnia vivunt, venite adoremus.” As most of the chants are unnotated, “*” appears in the mode column for the majority of chants. “?” in the mode column designates a chant with some notation, however little it may be. The differentia column is not used—there are no differentiae or invitatory tones in the manuscript.
As is customary is a liturgical book, psalm and canticle incipits (including the incipit of the invitatory psalm) are provided with antiphons. These are included in the “Addendum” field of the index; psalms have been given the prefix “ps” followed by their Vulgate number, and canticles have been indicated by their first word (or first few words). The canticles that appear in this index are:

Selected Bibliography

Emerson, John A. Albi, Bibliothèque Municipale Rochegude, Manuscript 44: A Complete Ninth-Century Gradual and Antiphoner from Southern France. Edited by Lila Collamore. Ottawa: The Institute of Mediaeval Music, 2002.
Colette, Marie-Noël. “Le Graduel-Antiphonaire, Albi, Bibliothèque Municipale, 44: une notation protoaquitaine rythmique.” In International Musicological Society Study Group Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the 6th Meeting in Eger, Hungary (1993). Edited by László Dobszay, pp. 117-139. Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Musicology, 1995.

The computer index was prepared by Lila Collamore from the edition by John A. Emerson.

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Aosta, Biblioteca del seminario maggiore, 6

Early thirteenth-century antiphoner said to be from the Collegiate church of Sant’Orso (St. Ours), Aosta. Square neumes on a four-line staff with F and/or C clefs; the F line is coloured. Cathedral cursus. 143 folios. One lacuna (after f. 89). Begins at Passion Sunday.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-45: Summer Temporale. 1r, Passion Sunday; 13v, Easter; 23v, Ascension; 26v, Pentecost; 29r, Trinity; 31v, Histories; 41v, Sundays after Pentecost.
Ff. 45-120: Sanctorale. 45v, Dedication of a Church; 48r, Conception of Mary; 51r, Agnes; 89r, Augustine; 98v, Michael; 102v, Gall; 105r, Simon & Jude; 106v, All Saints; 109v, Office for the Dead; 112r, Martin.
Ff. 120-133: Common of Saints. 120v, Common of Apostles; 131v, Common of Virgins.
Ff. 133-140: Invitatory Tones.
Ff. 141-143: Additamenta. 141r, Fabian & Sebastian, 143r, Mass chants.
At one time, this manuscript was part of a larger book. (See the earlier layer of foliation on some folios: f. 31r which was at one time f. lxxxv, for example.) F. 12 is out of place; it belongs before the present f. 1.

Many of the differentiae in this manuscript have been redrawn or erased. The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral.

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with “our.”

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell and Debra Lacoste at the University of Western Ontario.

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Arras, Bibliothèque municipale, 893 (olim 465)

Fourteenth-century breviary from the monastery of St.-Vaast d'Arras (Arras, France). 191 x 133 mm. Square Roman chant notation on red four-line staves; F and C clefs. Monastic cursus. 554 folios (including the six blank leaves at the beginning and seven blank leaves at the end, but not including the sixteen leaves interpolated throughout the manuscript).
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 7-12: Kalendar of Arras.
Ff. 13-256: Temporale. 13r, First Sunday of Advent; 37r, Christmas; 45r, Stephen; 84v, Ferial Office; 98v, Septuagesima; 108v, Ash Wednesday; 148v, Holy Thursday; 157r, Easter; 190v, Pentecost; 198r, Trinity; 202v, Histories; 207v, Antiphons "ad Benedicite"; 230r, Sundays after Pentecost.
Ff. 244v-247v: Office for the Dead. Ff. 248r-251v: Invitatory Tones. Ff. 254r-256v: Corpus Christi. Ff. 260r-289v: the Psalter. Ff. 289v-292r: Canticles. Ff. 294r-295v: Melodies for Responsory Verses not sung to modal formulas.
Ff. 297r-489r: Sanctorale. 297r, Andrew; 311r, Nicasius; 332r, Conversion of Paul; 343v, Vedastus (and Amandus); 353, Dedication of a Church; 367r, Benedict (three Offices); 380v, Translation of Hugo; 385v, Rictrudis; 386r, Deposition of Hugo; 387v, Translation of Aichardus; 400r, Translation of Benedict; 401v, Revelation of Vedastus; 407v, Mary Magdalene; 410, James; 417v, Laurence; 432v, Translation of Hadulfus; 434v, Aegidius; 444v, Aichardus; 458r, Translation of Vedastus; 458v, Leogardius; 470v, All Saints.
Ff. 489v-517v: Common of Saints. Ff. 518-547: Added Sanctorale. 518r, Elizabeth of Hungary; 520r, Translation of Christopher; 526r, Catherine; 539r, Visitation of Mary.
Owing to the proximity of Arras and Cambrai (formerly they both comprised one bishopric), there is much overlap in their repertories of Office chant; however, because Arras 893 is a monastic breviary (unlike Cambrai 38 and Impr. XVI C 4, which are cathedral or "secular" antiphoners) it records the Offices in an expanded format. The Visitation of Mary appears in both Cambrai Impr. XVI C 4 and Arras 893. Offices that appear in all three sources include Nicasius, Vedastus, and Catherine. The Office for Catherine is printed in full in Analecta hymnica vol. 26, pp. 212-215. The full texts for the Offices of Aichardus and James may also be found in Analecta hymnica vol. 13, pp. 25-27 and vol. 26, pp. 124-126, respectively. Benedict's Office appears in Analecta hymnica vol. 25, pp. 145-149.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by a "arr".

Sixteen leaves have been interpolated into the manuscript: they occur between 18v and 19r, 22v and 23r, 29v and 30r, 84v and 85r, 168v and 169r, 362v and 363r (five leaves), 429v and 430r, 441v and 442r (five leaves). The writing on these added leaves is later than that of the main body of the manuscript. These leaves are not numbered. The leaves following 29v and 429v record no chants, but the other fourteen leaves do. Chants found on these leaves are given sequence numbers of 18w (for recto) and 18x (for verso), etc. within the index in order to preserve the sequence order. (The five leaves after 441v are numbered 441w, 441x, 441y, 441z, 442a, 442b, 442c and 442d.) Differentiae are assigned arbitrary numbers.

Selected Bibliography

Heckenbach, Willibrord. "Das mittelalterlichen Reimofficium `Praeclarum late' zu den Festen das Heiligen Benedict." Itenera Domini: Festschrift fuer Emmanuel von Severus OSB zum 80. Geburtstag. Muenster: Aschendorff, 1988; pp. 189-210.
Leroquais, Victor. Les Breviaires: manuscrits des Bibliothèques publiques de France. 1: pp. 53-54. Paris; Macon: Protat Freres, 1934.

The computer file was prepared by Keith Glaeske, Charles Downey, and Lila Collamore at The Catholic University of America.

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Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 693

Franciscan breviary from central Italy. First half of the thirteenth century. Leaves approximately 260 x 185 mm. Small square notation and central-Italian staff notation. Cathedral Cursus. 249 folios, various scribal hands. This manuscript was reconstituted in the 1950s by Guiseppe Abate from parts of the former Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 693 and Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 694 (see Abate, 1960). A very similar gathering structure suggests that the two manuscripts were copied in the same scriptorium around the same time. An inventory of 1381 indicates that this manuscript (before reconsitution) was kept at the Sacro Convento in Assisi, but its location before this date is not known for certain.

The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra". The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in this index are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Abate, Guiseppe. “Il primitivo breviario francescano (1224-1227).” Miscellanea francescana 60 (1960): 47-240.
Mitchell, Andrew W. “The Chant of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Ph.D. diss., The Unversity of Western Ontario, 2003.
van Dijk, S.J.P. and Joan Hazelden Walker. The Origins of the Modern Roman Liturgy: The Liturgy of the Papal Court and the Franciscan Order in the Thirteenth Century. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1960.
van Dijk, S.J.P. “Some Manuscripts of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Franciscan Studies 14 (1954): 225-64.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 694

Franciscan breviary from central Italy. First half of the thirteenth century. Leaves approximately 270 x 190 mm. Small square notation and central-Italian staff notation. Cathedral Cursus. 392 folios and 3 flyleaves; various scribal hands. This manuscript was reconstituted in the 1950s by Guiseppe Abate from parts of the former Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 693 and Assisi, Biblioteca comunale, 694 (see Abate, 1960). A very similar gathering structure suggests that these two manuscripts were copied in the same scriptorium around the same time. An inventory of 1381 indicates that Assisi 693 (before reconsitution) was kept at the Sacro Convento in Assisi, but its location before this date is not known for certain.

The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the Widescreen File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra". The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in this index are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Abate, Guiseppe. “Il primitivo breviario francescano (1224-1227).” Miscellanea francescana 60 (1960): 47-240.
Mitchell, Andrew W. “The Chant of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Ph.D. diss., The Unversity of Western Ontario, 2003.
van Dijk, S.J.P. and Joan Hazelden Walker. The Origins of the Modern Roman Liturgy: The Liturgy of the Papal Court and the Franciscan Order in the Thirteenth Century. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1960.
van Dijk, S.J.P. “Some Manuscripts of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Franciscan Studies 14 (1954): 225-64.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Assisi, Cattedrale San Rufino - Archivio e Biblioteca, 5

Franciscan antiphoner from central Italy. Apparently thirteenth century, after 1235. 410 x 300mm. Central-Italian staff notation. Cathedral Cursus. 550 pages. The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the Widescreen File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra". The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in this index are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Miskuly, Jason M. “Julian of Speyer: Life of St. Francis.” Franciscan Studies 49 (1989): 93-115.
Mitchell, Andrew W. “The Chant of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Ph.D. diss., The Unversity of Western Ontario, 2003.
Ziino, Agostino. “Liturgia e musica francescana nei secoli XIII-XIV.” In Francesco d’Assisi: Storia e arte, 127-58. Milan: Electa, 1982.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Augsburg Antiphoner (London, British Library, Printed Books, IB 6753)

Vesperale. Hufnagelschrift. Cathedral cursus. 90 numbered folios. 348 x 238mm. Printed book, produced in Augsburg in 1495 by Erhard Ratdolt.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1r-49v: Temporale. 1r, Advent; 2v, O antiophons; 4r, Christmas; 10v, Stephen; 11v, John the Evangelist; 13v, Holy Innocents; 14v, Epiphany; 17v, Septuagesima; 18v, Lent; 22r, Triduum; 28r, Easter; 33v, Ascension; 35v, Pentecost; 38r, Trinity; 38v, Corpus Christi; 44v, Summer Histories.
Ff. 49v-78v: Sanctorale. 49v, Andrew; 50v, Nicholas; 51v, Thomas the Apostle; 51v, Sebastian; 52r, Conversion of Paul; 53v, Purification; 54v, Agatha; 54v, Peter’s Chair; 55r, Gregory; 55r, Annunciation; 56v, George; 57r, Phillip and James; 57v, Finding of the Cross; 58v, John the Baptist; 59v, Peter and Paul; 61r, Visitation of Mary; 62r, Ulric (Bishop of Augsburg); 63v, Seven Brothers; 64r, Mary Magdalene; 65v, Afra; 67v, Laurence; 68r, Assumption; 70v, Nativity of Mary; 71v, Dedication of a Church; 73r, Michael; 74r, Gall; 74v, All Saints; 75v, Martin; 76v, Elizabeth of Hungary; 77r, Catherine.
Ff. 186v-212v: Common of Saints. F. 86vff: Invitatory tones.
The explicit of this book indicates that the vesperale was revised by Magister Sixtus Haug [magistri Sixti Haugem revisum et emendatum] and that it was printed in 1495 on February 23 [vii. kal. Martii]. On the verso of the folio before the chants begin, there is a handwritten inscription, “Schloss Radegg.” This book is listed in the RELICS database, where other extant copies are listed (in RELICS, search under the phrase “Antiphonarium Augustense”). Although the book contains mostly chants for the Offices of First and Second Vespers, there are full offices for Christmas, the Triduum, Easter and Corpus Christi. In cases where the book does not indicate (and context does not clearly suggest) whether a chant belongs to First or Second Vespers, only “V” is marked in the Office field. The foliation used in this index is that found in the book. As well as the single unnumbered folio at the beginning of the book, there is an unnumbered folio at the end containing Ratdolt’s device (that is, his trademark) on its verso side.

The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-character system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral.

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with “aug”. In the invitatorale section of the book, the invitatory antiphon for Corpus Christi (Christum regem adoremus) is paired with the invitatory tone NE. However earlier in the Office of Corpus Christi, the incipit resembles the incipit for the tone CH. This latter tone is often associated in Office books with a particular antiphon melody used in the Christmas season (see Liber Usualis, p. 368ff), not the melody used for Christum regem in this book. Therefore the provisional code GR will be used for the tone incipit in the Corpus Christi Office. GR has this incipit in other sources of the CANTUS database, such as the Klosterneuberg manuscripts, for example.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Bamberg, Staatsbibliothek, lit. 25 (olim Ed.IV.11)

Late-thirteenth-century antiphoner from Bamberg Cathedral (Bamberg, Germany). 24.5 x 17 cm. German notation on a four-line staff; F and C clefs. Cathedral cursus. 151 folios. Twenty-nine lacunae.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-55: Winter Temporale and Sanctorale. 1r-12v, First through Fourth Sundays of Advent; lacuna; 13r-16v, Stephen; lacuna; 17r-20v, John to Holy Innocents; lacuna; 21r-23v, Circumcision to Epiphany; lacuna; 24r-30v, Ferial Office (Tuesday) to Agnes; lacuna; 31r-32v, Purification; lacuna; 33r-36v, Agatha, Gregory; lacuna; 37r-39v, Gregory, Benedict; lacuna; 40r-42v, Septuagesima; lacuna; 43r, Ash Wednesday; lacuna; 44r-47v, First through Second Sundays of Lent; lacuna; 48, Second Sunday of Lent; lacuna; 49, Palm Sunday; lacuna; 50r-51v, Holy Week; lacuna; 52r-53v, Good Friday; lacuna; 54r-55v, Holy Saturday; lacuna.
Ff. 56-110v: Summer Temporale and Sanctorale. 56r-59v, Paschaltide; lacuna; 60, Common of Saints in Eastertide; lacuna; 61, Philip and James, Finding of the Cross; lacuna; 62r-66v, Finding of the Cross to Ascension; lacuna; 67, Pentecost; lacuna; 69r, Trinity; 71v-77v, John the Baptist to Peter and Paul; lacuna; 78r-91v, Mary Magdalene to Assumption (83r-87r, Afra; 87r, Laurence); lacuna; 92r-96v, Assumption to Nativity of Mary; lacuna; 97r-99v, Translation of Kunegunde; lacuna; 100r-103v, Martin to Cecilia; lacuna; 104r-110r, Catherine to Nicholas.
Ff. 110v-122v: Common of Saints. 110v, Apostles; 112v, Martyrs; 115v, Single Martyr; 117v, Single Confessor; 120v, Virgins.
Ff. 122v-124v: Dedication of a Church (lacuna between folios 123 and 124). Ff. 125r-139r: Summer Histories (lacunae between folios 136 and 137, and 138 and 139). Ff. 139r-144v: Sundays after Pentecost. Ff. 145r-146v: Office for the Dead (lacuna between folios 145 and 146). Ff. 146r-151v: Invitatory Tones.
Five manuscripts of the Bamberg tradition survive (Bamberg, lit. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26). Bamberg, lit. 23 was used by Hesbert in his Corpus Antiphonalium Officii (it is his manuscript "B"), but of these five manuscripts, only Bamberg, lit. 25 is written in staff notation (the other four consist of non-diastematic neumes). As the only one transcribable into modern notation, it is a valuable key to the musical tradition of Bamberg. Unfortunately, Bamberg, lit. 25 is incomplete; numerous folios are missing from the codex. Nevertheless, it has its treasures: most notably, the Office of Afra (83r-87r) and the Translation of Kunegunde (97r-99v). The latter is printed in full in Analecta hymnica, vol. 26, pp. 224-227.

Differentiae are designated by a letter that indicates the pitch on which the differentia ends; where necessary, additional numbers are used to distinguish differentiae of the same mode that end on the same pitch.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by "bam".

Selected Bibliography
Collamore, Lila and Metzinger, Joseph P.. The Bamberg Antiphoner Staatsbibliothek, lit. 25. With an introduction by Ruth Steiner. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America, 1990.
Steiner, Ruth. "An Index to the Bamberg Antiphoner Staatsbibliothek, lit. 25." In International Musicological Society Study Group Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the Fourth Meeting, Pecs, Hungary, 3-8 September 1990, ed. Laszlo Dobszay, et al., 599-605. Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1990.

The computer file was prepared by Lila Collamore and Joseph P. Metzinger at The Catholic University of America.

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Benevento, Biblioteca capitolare, 19 and 20

Pars hiemalis and pars aestiva, respectively, of a liber typicus (combined breviary and missal) for non-monastic use. 12th century. From Benevento, Italy. Fully-diastematic Beneventan neumes oriented around a single dry-point line. Occasional quilismas. Several lacunae. 279 and 300 folios. Although these manuscripts include chants for the Mass as well as the Office, only the Office chants are listed in this index.

Benevento 19

Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-101: Winter Sanctorale (through Annunciation). 1r, Nicholas; 7v, Thomas; 10v, Silvester; 15v, Maurus; 41v, Purification; 62v, Modestus; 80v, Gregory; 96r, Annunciation; 101v, Mass for non-Paschal Martyrs.
Ff. 102-111: Music and Texts of Prayers. 102r, "Incipit ordo ad celebrandum missa"; 107r, Preface Dialogue; 108v, large illumination of a priest before a cross; 110r, Pater noster.
Ff. 112-274: Winter Temporale (ends in fourth week of Lent). 112r, First Sunday of Advent; 121r, Great "O" Antiphons; 132r, Christmas; 145r, Stephen; 162v, Epiphany; 172r, Ferial Office; 189r, Septuagesima; 206r, Ash Wednesday; 264v, Fourth Sunday of Lent.

Benevento 20

Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-142: Summer Temporale (incomplete). 1r, Easter Tuesday; 46r, Ascension; 56v, Pentecost; 75v, Summer Histories interspersed with Sundays after Pentecost (lacuna from middle of Kings to end of Job); 137v, Trinity.
Ff. 143-152: Music and Texts of Prayers. 143r, "Incipit ordo ad celebrandum missa"; 149r, Preface Dialogue; 149v, large illumination of a priest before a cross; 151r, Pater noster. Ff. 153-295: Summer Sanctorale (incomplete, through Cosmas and Damian). 153r, Commons for Paschal Saints; 165r, Finding of the Cross; 191v, John the Baptist; 249v, Transfiguration (lacuna in Matins); 250r, Laurence (beginning incomplete); 257v, Assumption; 265v, Bartholomew; 271v, Beheading of John the Baptist; 289r, Januarius and Companions; 291v, Matthew.
The two sources together do not present the complete cycle of either Temporale or Sanctorale. There are two significant lacunae in MS 20 (noted in the catalogue above). Most of the material from the first through the fourteenth Sundays after Pentecost has been lost in the first lacuna and, in the second, nearly all of the unusual Beneventan Office for Transfiguration (6 August) as well as anything between that date and the feast of St. Laurence (10 August). Except for these lacunae, the content of each manuscript is liturgically continuous. However, a significant portion of the annual cycle is missing due to the apparent loss of folios from the beginning and/or end of both manuscripts. The Temporale is complete as one passes from the end of MS 20 (the last Sunday after Pentecost) to the beginning of MS 19 (the first Sunday of Advent). However, the end of Lent, including the Triduum, Easter itself, and the beginning of Eastertide have been lost between the end of MS 19 (Tuesday in the fourth week of Lent) and the beginning of MS 20 (Tuesday after Easter). In the Sanctorale there are gaps between Annunciation (25 March, the end of MS 19) and Mark the Evangelist (25 April, the beginning of MS 20); and between Cosmas and Damian (27 September, the end of MS 20) and Nicholas (6 December, the beginning of MS 19). There are no chants for the Commons, the Dedication of a Church, or the Office for the Dead. It is not clear why the two volumes were bound in different orderings (Sanctorale then Temporale in MS 19 and the reverse in MS 20). This arrangement explains in part the sections of the calendar that were lost at the end of both manuscripts: a modest portion of the Temporale at the end of MS 19 and the larger section of the Sanctorale at the end of MS 20. Kelly has identified several Offices in each of these manuscripts which contain antiphons that are Beneventan or have cadences or other features that are Beneventan in character. These are shown in the facsimiles that appear in Paléographie musicale 21.

Chants not found in CAO are assigned numbers beginning with "ben".

Selected Bibliography
Boe, John. Beneventanum Troporum Corpus II: Ordinary Chants and Tropes for the Mass from Southern Italy, A.D. 1000-1250, Part 3: Preface Chants and Sanctus. Recent Researches in the Music of the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance, 25. Madison, Wisconsin: A-R Editions, 1996. P. lxxx.
Kelly, Thomas Forrest. The Beneventan Chant. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989. Pl. 5, 6; p. 184.
________. Les temoins manuscrits du chant beneventain. Paléographie musicale, 21. Solesmes: Association Jean-Bougler, 1992. Pl. 5-31, pp. 334-37.

The index file was prepared by Keith Glaeske and Lila Collamore at The Catholic University of America.

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Berlin, Staatsbibliothek, Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Mus. 40047 (Quedlinburg Antiphoner)

Eleventh-century antiphoner. Secular cursus. Late Carolingian minuscule script. Non-diastematic neumatic notation. Light to medium brown ink used for text and neumes; red ink used for rubrics, initials, etc. Leaves approximately 25 x 19 cm. Prefaced by liturgical calendar. 144 folios. Quedlinburg was an important political and spiritual centre of Saxony in the tenth and eleventh centuries, closely associated with the Ottonian dynasty; it was likely both the place of origin and the intended destination of both the calendar and the antiphoner. These were likely copied between the years 1025 and 1070 (Möller, vol. 1, 32-8). Möller also suggests that these two documents could have been drafted independently of one another (ibid., 21). The original script of the antiphoner is supplemented by numerous marginal additions by later hands. These additions have been included in the index with identifiers in the “marginalia” field of the index (see the Widescreen File Description). In places where these additions are illegible in the facsimile, Möller’s transcriptions have been adopted in the index. Of particular interest are the chants for Godehard (77r, marginal), Servatius (079r, main text), the Translation of Justa (093r, marginal), the Translation of Servatius (93v, marginal), and the Passion of Laurentia (099v, marginal). Godehard was appointed bishop of Hildesheim (near Quedlinburg) by the Ottonian Henry II in the early eleventh century. The most prominent church in Quedlinburg is dedicated to Servatius, the first bishop of Tongeren, and his relics were translated to Quedlinburg from Maastricht (Servatius’s final resting place) in the tenth century (Zender, et al., p. 25 and Map 28). The identity of Justa in this manuscript is currently unknown. Relics of a “Jungfrau Laurentia” were obtained by King Otto I (912-973) during his exploits in Italy and brought to Quedlinburg (Schramm and Mütherich, p. 27), but whether this is the same person has not yet been substantiated. The rubric "post b" is found a number of times in the added marginalia of the Quedlinburg antiphoner, always preceding an antiphon, either at the end of Lauds or at the end of Vespers. The rubric is sometimes given as "post benedicam" (= post Benedicamus, top margin of folio 73r) or as a variant of "post b Mag" (folio 104r) or "p Magnif." (folio 41v). Many of the antiphons indicated by these rubrics have the character of memorials. In addition to their positition at the end of Lauds and Vespers, the texts also suggest memorials. These antiphons include Christmas chants found on the feasts of Stephen, John the Evangelist and Holy Innocents; moreover, the chant on the first Sunday of Advent, Ecce dominus veniet (cao2509), is often used in Office books to commemorate All Saints during this season of the liturgical year. In some cases, these antiphons do not suggest memorials as clearly, for example, Quam pulchra es (cao4434) on the feast of the Assumption and Domine si tu es (cao2387) on the feast of Peter’s Chair. Both of these chants are typical of the prevailing feast. However, because of their position and how they are marked in the manuscript (in the same way as chants that seem less ambiguous), these chants have provisionally been identified as memorials. It may be that these antiphons were intended for use as memorials during the octaves of these feasts, but no clear indication is given in the manuscript.

The index for this manuscript was drafted using Möller’s facsimile, in which differentia formulas are very difficult to read. Accordingly when present, differentia are indicated by question marks.

Modes for responsories are provisional; they are being proposed according to an analysis of the neume patterns found in responsory verses and the modal designations of corresponding responsories in other sources represented in the database. This analysis has demonstrated that the standard verse tones are consistently represented within these leaves by neume patterns distinctive for each mode. Because of their provisional nature, all mode numbers for responsories in the file are followed by a question mark. Where there is any ambiguity (such as in cases where a non-standard tone is given for a verse or where the verse cannot be sufficiently read), a mode has not been assigned.

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with “que”.

Selected Bibliography
Möller, Hartmut. Das Quedlinburger Antiphonar. Vol. 1. Untersuchungen. Vol. 2. Edition und Verzeichnisse. Vol. 3. Fotografische Wiedergabe.
Mainzer Studien zur Musikwissenschaft. Tutzing: Hans Schneider, 1990.
Schramm, Percy Ernst and Florentine Mütherich. Denkmale der deutschen Könige und Kaiser. München: Prestel, 1962.
Zender, M. and J. Fellenberg gen. Reinold. Reliquientranslationen zwischen 600 und 1200. In Atlas zur Kirchengeschichte: Die Christlichen Kirchen in Geschichte und Gegenwart, Commentary, pp. 24-25 and Map 28. Ed. Hubert Jedin, Kenneth Scott Latourette and Jochen Martin, et al. Freiburg: Herder, 1970.

The computer index was prepared by Kate Helsen (Universität Regensburg) with editorial assistance from Elizabeth Sander and Andrew Mitchell (The University of Western Ontario).

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Budapest, Egyetemi Könyvtár (University Library), lat. 118, 119, 122, 121

Lat. 118

Franciscan Antiphoner. Fourteenth century. 485 x 325 mm. Square notation on a four-line staff. Cathedral cursus. 249 folios, including three interpolated leaves (ff. 85, 135, and 235).
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-249: Winter Temporale. 1r, First Sunday of Advent; 53r, Christmas; 61v, Stephen; 106r-133r, Ferial Office; 134v, Septuagesima; 159r, Ash Wednesday; 227r, Maundy Thursday.

Lat. 119

Franciscan Antiphoner. Fourteenth century. 485 x 335 mm. Square notation on a four-line staff. Cathedral cursus. 129 folios, including eleven interpolated leaves (ff. 1a-1b, 17, 23, 29, 69, 71-2, 101, 125-7); one lacuna.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): F. 1a: Te deum (begins on the verso--1b--and continues on the recto).
Ff. 1-128: Summer Temporale. 1r, Easter; 40v, Ascension; 48v, Pentecost; 60r, Summer Histories (Kings only); 73r-84r, Sundays after Pentecost; 84r-90v, Summer Histories (Wisdom); lacuna; 91r-128v, Summer Histories (Job to Prophets).

Lat. 122

Franciscan Antiphoner. Fourteenth century. 477 x 310 mm. Square notation on a four-line staff. Cathedral cursus. 179 folios, including six interpolated leaves (ff. 63-68).
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-179: Sanctorale, from Andrew to Beheading of John the Baptist. 63r-67r, Peter of Alcantara (66r, Translation of Peter of Alcantara); 76v-87r, Anthony of Padua; 114r, Paul; 135r, Mary of the Snows; 143r, Laurence; 153r-162v, Clare.

Lat. 121

Franciscan Antiphoner. Fourteenth century. 522 x 340 mm. Square notation on a four-line staff. Cathedral cursus. 142 folios, including seven interpolated leaves (ff. 110-2, 123-6).
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-75v: Sanctorale, from Nativity of Mary to Clement. 26v-41r, Francis of Assisi; 41r, All Saints; 58r-65v, Elizabeth of Hungary.
Ff. 76r-127r: Common of Saints (127r, Common of Matrons). Ff. 127r-137v: Dedication of a Church. Ff. 139r-142v: Office for the Dead.
Together, these four manuscripts record the Office for the entire liturgical year. The history of these manuscripts is little known before they were acquired by the University Library of Budapest during the reign of Joseph II of Hungary (1780-90). That they were used by the Franciscan Order, however, is clear from a number of inscriptions in the manuscripts, and the occurrence of saints especially venerated by that order (i.e., Peter of Alcantara, Anthony of Padua, Clare, and Francis of Assisi). The Office of Anthony of Padua appears in full in Analecta hymnica, vol. 5, pp. 126-9; the Offices for Clare and Francis appear in the same volume, pp. 157-60 and 175-8, respectively. The Office for Elizabeth of Hungary appears in full in Analecta hymnica , vol. 25, pp. 253-8. An edition of the text and music has been published by Barbara Haggh.

The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the Widescreen File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra". The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in these indices are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Haggh, Barbara. Two Offices for St Elizabeth of Hungary: Introduction and Edition. Musicological Studies LXV/1. Ottawa: Institute of Mediaeval Music, 1995.
Rado, D. Polycarpus. Libri liturgici manuscripti bibliothecarum Hungaricae et limitropharum regionum. Budapest: Akademiai Kiado, 1973, especially pp. 523-27.

The computer file was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at The University of Western Ontario, with the editorial assistance of Keith Glaeske (The Catholic University of America).

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Cambrai, Bibliothèque municipale, 38 (olim 40)

Antiphoner from Cambrai Cathedral (Cambrai, France). Ca. 1230- 1250 (with later additions). 342 x 230 mm. Square Roman chant notation on four-line staves, with F and C clefs. Cathedral cursus. 433 folios. Two lacunae.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1r-9r: Invitatory Tones. Ff. 10r-191r: Temporale. 10r, First Sunday of Advent; 31v, Christmas; 53r, Antiphons "ad Completorium;" 53v, Invitatory Antiphons; 57r, Ferial Office; 67r, Septuagesima; 75r, Ash Wednesday; 108r, Holy Thursday; 119r, Easter; 133r, Pascha Annotinum; 145v, Pentecost; 151v, Trinity; 156r, Common of Mary; 158v, Histories (159v, Invitatory Antiphons); 180v, Sundays after Pentecost; 186r, Dedication of a Church.
Ff. 192r-382r: Sanctorale. 192r, Andrew; 201r, Aubertius; 205r, Nicasius; 210r, Stephen; 221v, Thomas Becket; 237v, Elevation of Aubertius; 240v, Conversion of Paul; 244v, Aldegundis; 252r, Waldetrudis; 255v, Vedastus; 289v, Mary Magdalene; 293v, Christopher; 301r, Laurence; 305r, Gaugericus; 317r, Augustine; 334r, Lambertus; 343r, Firminus; 347v-351v, Cosmas and Damian to Dennis; lacuna; 352r, Ursula and the Ten Thousand Virgins; 356r, Office for the Dead; 365r, Maxellendis; 368v, Elizabeth of Hungary; 378r, Catherine.
Ff. 383r-404r: Common of Saints (398v, Common of Abbots). Ff. 405- 435: Added Sanctorale. 405r, Immaculate Conception; 408v, Elizabeth of Hungary; 412r, Finding of Firminus; 416v, Transfiguration; 421r, Corpus Christi; 427r-431v, Office of the Crown of Thorns; lacuna; 432r, Aegidius (unnotated).
Cambrai 38 is a rich source of chants and Offices not found in CAO ; several are printed in full within Analecta hymnica . They include Thomas Becket (Analecta hymnica vol. 13, pp. 242-5), Lambertus (Analecta hymnica vol. 26, 230-3), both Offices for Elizabeth of Hungary (Analecta hymnica vol. 25, pp. 253-8 and 260-4, respectively; the Finding of Firminus (Analecta hymnica vol. 13, pp. 145-7), and the Crown of Thorns (Analecta hynnica vol. 24, pp. 30-4). Because Cambrai 38 and Cambrai XVI both come from Cambrai cathedral, there is considerable overlap between these two sources. Offices that are contained fully or partially in both manuscripts include Corpus Christi, Vedastus, Mary Magdalene, Gaugericus, Augustine, the Elevation of Elizabeth of Hungary, and Catherine. Because of Cambrai's proximity to Arras (at one time they were under the same bishop), Cambrai 38 and Arras 893 also have features in common; however, Arras 893 follows the monastic cursus, so its Offices do not correspond exactly to those in Cambrai 38. The Offices of Corpus Christi, Nicasius, the Finding of Firminus, and Vedastus appear in both of these manuscripts.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by "cam". Differentiae are identified with numbers chosen arbitrarily; the numbering of differentiae in this file corresponds to that in the file for Cambrai XVI.

Selected Bibliography
Haggh, Barbara. "Guillaume du Fay and the Evolution of the Liturgy at Cambrai Cathedral in the Fifteenth Century." In International Musicological Society Study Group Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the Fourth Meeting, Pecs, Hungary, 3-8 September, 1990, ed. Laszlo Dobszay, 549-69. Budapest: Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1990.
Haggh, Barbara. "Plainchant Compositions from Cambrai, 1251-1474: A Preliminary List of Works." In Proceedings of the Congress of the International Musicological Society, Madrid, 1992 (forthcoming).
________. Two Offices for St Elizabeth of Hungary: "Gaudeat Hungaria" and "Letare Germania". Historiae, ed. Laszlo Dobszay, Barbara Haggh, and Ruth Steiner, 1. Ottawa: Institute of Mediaeval Music, 1995.
________; Glaeske, Keith; Downey, Charles and Collamore, Lila. Two Cambrai Antiphoners: Cambrai, Médiathèque Municipale, 38 and Impr. XVI C 4. With an Introduction by Barbara Haggh. Ottawa: Institute for Mediaeval Music, 1995.

The computer file was prepared by Barbara Haggh, Keith Glaeske (Catholic University of America), and Lila Collamore (Catholic University of America).

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Cambrai, Bibliothèque municipale, Impr. XVI C 4

Antiphoner printed in Paris by Simon Vostre between 1508 and 1518. 385 x 264 mm. Black square Roman chant notation on red four-line staves, with F and C clefs. Cathedral cursus. 256 leaves, foliated i-viii, 1-248.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. ii r-vi r: Kalendar of Cambrai. F. vi v: Magnificat tones, tonus peregrinus.
Ff. 1r-93v: Temporale. 1r, First Sunday of Advent; 5r, Christmas; 7r, "Vox dicentes"; 11r, "Liber generationis Jesu"; 20v, "Factum est autem"; 24v, Septuagesima; 26r, Ash Wednesday; 34r, Maundy Thursday (34r, 34v, 35r, 39v, 40r, 40v, 43r, 43v, 44r, Tones for the Lamentations of Jeremiah); 47r, Easter; 58r, Pascha Annotinum; 64r, Pentecost; 68v, Trinity; 73v, Corpus Christi; 81r, Summer Histories; 85r, Sundays after Pentecost; 88r-93v, Dedication of a Church.
Ff. 93v-198v: Sanctorale. 93v, Andrew; 95r, Barbara; 103r, Stephen; 108v, Finding of Firminus; 109r, Furse; 110v, Antoninus; 115r, Aldegundis; 120v, Vedastus; 142r, Visitation of Mary; 147r, Martial; 148v, Anne; 150r, Mary Magdalene; 162v, the Recollectio Mariae; 174r, Adrianus; 176v, Elevation of Gaugericus; 179v, Donatianus; 181v, Amatus; 182r, Ursula; 184v, All Saints; 188v, Office for the Dead; 194v, Maxellendis; 195v, Elevation of Elizabeth of Hungary; 197v, Catherine.
Ff. 199r-200v: Ferial Office. Ff. 201r-226v: Common of Saints (220r, Common of Abbots; 225r, Common of Wives). Ff. 226v-228r: Chants "ad Completorium." Ff. 228v-233v: Invitatory Tones. Ff. 234r-243v: Antiphons "ad Benedictus" (234r, Advent; 237v, Septuagesima, Ash Wednesday; 241v, Ascension; 241v, Sundays after Pentecost). Ff. 244r- 245r: Common of Mary. Ff. 245r-248v: Antiphons "ad Suffragium."
Cambrai XVI C 4, like Cambrai 38, is a rich source of chants and Offices not found in CAO . Offices found only in the former source include Barbara, Furse, Antoninus, Martialis, Anne, Donatus and Amatus (for Offices common to both files, please consult the introductory file to Cambrai 38). Cambrai XVI C 4 also contains lesson tones not found in Cambrai 38: the "Vox dicentes" and "Liber generationis Jesu" lessons and tones for the Lamentations of Jeremiah. Of particular note is the special Office, the Recollectio Mariae, dedicated in Cambrai cathedral by the canon Michel de Beringhen in 1457. The texts are by Giles Carlier, dean of Cambrai, and the chants were composed by Guillaume Dufay. (For more on this unique Office, see Haggh , "The Celebration of the Recollectio Festorum Beatae Mariae Virginis 1457-1987.")

Differentiae are identified by numbers chosen arbitrarily; the numbering system for this file is also used in the file for Cambrai 38. However, there are gaps in the numbering of the differentiae in this file, because not all of the differentiae of Cambrai reappear in this source.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number, prefixed either by "cam" or "cax": those chants beginning with "cam" can also be found in Cambrai 38, whereas the chants beginning with "cax" appear only in Cambrai XVI.

Selected Bibliography
Downey, Charles, and Glaeske, Keith. "The Music and Text of the Lamentations: A Comparison of Cambrai XVI C 4 and Graz 29." Medieval Perspectives 10 (1995): pp. 86-100.
Haggh, Barbara. "The First Printed Antiphoner of Cambrai Cathedral." In Gestalt und Entstehung musikalischer Quellen im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert. (Proceedings of the Conference "Die Entstehung einer musikalischen Quelle im 15. und 16. Jahrhundert," Wolfenbuettel, 14-18 September, 1992.) Edited by Martin Staehelin. (Quellenstudien zur Musik der Renaissance, 3; Wolfenbütteler Forschungen, 83.) Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz, 1998.
________. "The Celebration of the Recollectio Festorum Beatae Mariae Virginis, 1457-1987." Studia Musicologica Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae 30 (1988): pp. 361-373.
________. "The Aostan Sources for the Recollectio Festorum Beatae Mariae Virginis by Guillaume du Fay." International Musicological Study Group Cantus Planus: Papers Read at the Third Meeting, Tihany, 1988 , 355-375. Budapest: 1990.
________; Glaeske, Keith; Downey, Charles and Collamore, Lila. Two Cambrai Antiphoners: Cambrai, Mediatheque Municipal, 38 and Impr. XVI C 4. With an Introduction by Barbara Haggh. Ottawa: Institute for Mediaeval Music, 1995.

The computer file was prepared by Barbara Haggh, Keith Glaeske (Catholic University), and Charles Downey (Catholic University).

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Cambridge, University Library, Mm.ii.9 (The " Barnwell Antiphoner")

Rubricated Sarum antiphoner, probably from St. Giles Abbey, an Augustinian house at Barnwell, England. From the second quarter of the thirteenth century. 34 x 24 cm. Square notation on four-line staff. Cathedral cursus. 567 pages. The beginning of the manuscript--perhaps the first four gatherings--is missing, as is a gathering containing the end of the Temporale and the beginning of the Commons (pp. 609-32). Walter Howard Frere used Cambridge, Mm.ii.9 as the main source for his facsimile edition of the Sarum antiphoner (published as Antiphonale Sarisburiense ). This MS lacks the first part of the Winter Temporale (from Advent to Epiphany), and Frere compensated for this by reproducing folios from several different sources, among them the Erlyngham Breviary. Our index, however, covers only the part of the year contained in the Barnwell Antiphoner. The pagination follows that of the facsimile edition. The numbering of differentiae follows Frere's, which is based on that in the Sarum Tonale (published by Frere in The Use of Sarum ). In this Tonale, the tonus peregrinus is assigned to mode 8 differentia 5, and this numbering is followed in the index. Within each differentia, the compiler of the Tonale assigned each antiphon to a variatio, a group of antiphons that begin on the same note or with the same figure. Frere went further and assigned some antiphons within a variatio to a group (antiphons with similar melodies); most of these groups are discussed in the Introduction to Antiphonale Sarisburiense. Variatio is indicated by a number, group by a lower-case letter. Indications of variatio and group are not included in the Basic version of the file but are included in both the Widescreen version and the printed version of the index of antiphons (see below).

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by "sar". It should be noted that the Office for the Translation of Thomas Becket listed above is incomplete, and is given in incipit only, without music. (Presumably it appeared in full in the part of the manuscript now lost.) The complete text for the Office may be found in Analecta hymnica , vol. 13, pp. 238-42, and an edition of the text and music appears in James Boyce, "Cantica Carmelitana: The Chants of the Carmelite Office," Ph.D. diss., City University of New York, 1984.

Whenever posssible, we have corrected mistakes that occurred in the typesetting of Frere's original index. Below are some notes for the computer file: Selected Bibliography
Frere, Walter Howard ed. Antiphonale Sarisburiense. London: Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society, 1901-24; reprint, Farnborough: Gregg Press Limited, 1966.
________. The Use of Sarum, II. The Ordinal and Tonale. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1901.
Collamore, Lila. "An Index to the Antiphons of the Sarum Antiphoner Cambridge, University Library, Mm.ii.9." M.A. thesis, Catholic University of America, 1990.
Collamore, Lila and Metzinger, Joseph P. eds. Frere's Index to the Antiphons of the Sarum Antiphoner. With an introduction by Ruth Steiner. London: Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society, 1990.
Hesbert, Rene-Jean. "The Sarum Antiphoner--Its Sources and Influence." Journal of the Plainsong and Mediaeval Music Society 3 (1980): 49-55.

The computer file was prepared by Lila Collamore, Joseph P. Metzinger, and Keith Glaeske at The Catholic University of America.

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Chiavenna, Tesoro della Collegiata di S. Lorenzo - Museo capitolare, s.c.

Eleventh-century antiphoner from Chiavenna, Italy. Messine neumes. Cathedral cursus. 98 folios (incomplete).
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1v-62r: Winter Temporale and Sanctorale. 1v, First Sunday of Advent; 11v, Christmas; 15r, Stephen; 25v, Ferial Office; 39v, First Sunday of Lent; 55r, Maundy Thursday.
Ff. 62r-98v: Summer Temporale and Sanctorale. 62r, Easter; 73v, Ascension; 76r, Pentecost; 88v, Paul; 94v, Laurence; 98v, Assumption (incomplete).
All chants not found in CAO are assigned an arbitrary number, beginning with an "chi"; the manuscript contains no differentiae.

Selected Bibliography
Carter, Shannon K. "An Analytical Inventory of an Eleventh-Century Antiphoner Preserved in the Biblioteca Capitolare di S. Lorenzo in Chiavenna." M.A. thesis, The University of Western Ontario, 1995.

The computer file was prepared by Shannon Carter (The University of Western Ontario), with editorial assistance from Keith Glaeske (Catholic University).

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Chicago, Newberry Library, 24 (Newberry Acquisition Number 23817)

Franciscan breviary from central Italy. Thirteenth century, possibly from the first half. 197 x 140 mm. Central-Italian staff notation. Cathedral Cursus. 266 folios and 2 paper flyleaves. A number of late additions (to the kalendar and in other marginal notes) suggest an association with Perugia (see van Dijk, 1956), but the location where the manuscript was first produced is uncertain. The manuscript has been at the Newberry Library since the late nineteenth century. The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the Widescreen File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra". The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in this index are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Mitchell, Andrew W. “The Chant of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Ph.D. diss., The Unversity of Western Ontario, 2003.
Saenger, Paul. A Catalogue of the pre-1500 Western Manuscript Books at the Newberry Library. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.
van Dijk, S.J.P. and Joan Hazelden Walker. The Origins of the Modern Roman Liturgy: The Liturgy of the Papal Court and the Franciscan Order in the Thirteenth Century. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1960.
van Dijk, S.J.P. “Some Manuscripts of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Franciscan Studies 14 (1956): 60-101.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Città del Vaticano (Roma), Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Cappella Sistina 27

Antiphoner copied during the reign of Pope Julius II (probably 1510) for use in the Sistine Chapel. Staff notation. Covers only the beginning of the liturgical year (ends at Octave of Epiphany). 149 folios.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-148: Temporale and Sanctorale together: 2r, First Sunday of Advent; 37r, Great "O" Antiphons; 70r, Christmas; 107v, Stephen; 111r, John the Evangelist; 115v, Holy Innocents; 119v, Thomas Becket; 122r, Silvester; 128v, Epiphany; 142v, Octave of Epiphany. F. 149, blank.
The manuscript usually includes only the chants for Lauds and Vespers, and the Little Hours in some cases (First Sunday of Advent, Christmas Eve, Christmas, and Epiphany). Christmas is the only feast to have a Matins service (ff. 73r-96v). Therefore, the only invitatory in the manuscript is the one assigned to Christmas, and it is accompanied by a complete invitatory psalm tone (ff. 73r-79r). The indexer has assigned numbers arbitrarily to the manuscript's differentiae. Only the second differentia in mode 1 seemed problematic: erasures (ff. 12r, 14r) indicate that the form of this differentia was altered by a later hand. Its original form was probably similar, if not identical, to the differentia (1.3) assigned to "Inclinavit dominus aurem suam" (13r), which appears nowhere else in the source. When this antiphon occurs again later in the manuscript (44v), it is assigned the revised form of 1.2, indicating that the editing scribe apparently neglected to change the differentia on 13r. No attempt has been made to represent the erasures in the index. Some antiphons in the manuscript (ff. 14r, 18r, 28v, 35r, 80r) appear to have the mode 1 intonation, but no differentia. This may indicate the second differentia which, in its altered form, is given as A-A-A-A-A-A. The index, however, indicates only that there is no differentia for these chants. Two other antiphons (ff. 130r, 131r) are assigned what appears to be a slightly different form of this differentia, perhaps in a later hand. Probably because there are so few antiphons in the manuscript, three other differentiae occur only once: 4.2, "Sion noli timere ecce deus" (19r); 4.3, "Ad te domine levavi" (55v); and 7.3, "Stella ista sicut flamma" (131v). Comparison with other manuscripts in the CANTUS database confirms that these antiphons are commonly associated with unusual differentiae.

The manuscript has no Ferial Office. However, some ferial antiphons--one series for Lauds and one for Vespers (ff. 11r-14r)--are intended to be sung on all week days during the first three weeks of Advent (but not the final week, which has its own proper antiphons for Lauds, according to the rubric on 10v).

The foliation in the index follows the more recent foliation (small Arabic numerals in each recto's lower margin) rather than the earlier one (the Roman numerals in the right margin, which include two misfoliations).

All chants not included in CAO have been assigned a number prefixed by "rvs".

The computer file was prepared at The Catholic University of America by Charles Downey.

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Città del Vaticano (Roma), Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, lat. 8737

Franciscan breviary from central Italy. Possibly thirteenth century, after 1232. 215 x 152 mm. Central-Italian staff notation. Cathedral Cursus. 301 folios. The latest indication of date in the manuscript is the name of Dominic (canonized in 1232) in the kalendar, in the main hand. Apart from that, no clear indications of date have been uncovered. The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: an upper-case letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. Differentiae that vary in terms only of immediately repeated notes, presence/absence of liquesence or neumation are give the same differentia code, but are distinguished with a lowercase letter in the first column of the “Extra” field (see the Widescreen File Description).

Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "fra".

The codes for differentiae and chants not found in CAO in this index are consistent with those used for the other Franciscan manuscripts in the database: Selected Bibliography
Bannister, Henry Marriott. Monumenti vaticani di paleografia musicale latina. 2 volumes. Lipsia: O. Harrossowitz, 1913.
Bruning, Eliseus. “Giuliano da Spira e l’Officio ritmico di S. Francesco.” Note d’archivio per la storia musicale 4 (1927): 145-47.
Felder, Hilarin. Die liturgischen Reimofficien auf die heligen Franciscus und Antonius gedichtet und componiert durch Fr. Julien von Speier (†c. 1250). Freiburg: Universitäts-Buchandlung, 1901.
Mitchell, Andrew W. “The Chant of the Earliest Franciscan Liturgy.” Ph.D. diss., The Unversity of Western Ontario, 2003.
van Dijk, S.J.P. and Joan Hazelden Walker. The Origins of the Modern Roman Liturgy: The Liturgy of the Papal Court and the Franciscan Order in the Thirteenth Century. London: Darton, Longman and Todd, 1960.

The computer index was prepared by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario.

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Città del Vaticano (Roma), Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, San Pietro B.79

Twelfth century antiphoner of St. Peter's containing the Old Roman repertory of liturgical chant. Central-Italian notation on a dry-point staff with the F-line in red and the c-line in yellow. F- and c-clefs. Cathedral Cursus. 350 x 250 mm. 11 lines of music per side. Ff. 188r-194r, 14 lines of music per side. Ff. 193v-195v, 16 lines of music per side. 197 folios.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1r-3v Kalendar.
Ff. 4r-102v: Winter Temporale and Sanctorale. 4r, First Sunday of Advent; 4r, Andrew; 14r, Nicholas; 14v, Great “O” antiphons; 15r, Lucy; 24r, Thomas the Apostle; 25r, Christmas; 31r, Stephen; 33r, John the Evangelist; 35r, Holy Innocents; 38r, Silvester; 38r, Epiphany; 42r, Celsus and Julian; 43r, Dominical and Ferial Offices; 55v, Marcellus; 55v Aquila and Prisca; Marius, Martha, and others; 56v, Fabian and Sebastian; 58v, Agnes; 60v, Vincent; 60v, Anastasia; 61r; Cyrus and John; 61r, Purification; 62v, Agatha; 65r, Peter's Chair; 65r, Forty Martyrs; 65v, Annunciation; 65v, Septuagesima; 70v, Ash Wednesday; 89v, Palm Sunday; 95r, Triduum.
Ff. 103r-175r: Summer Temporale and Sanctorale. 103r, Easter; 113v, George; 114v, Mark; 116r, Philip and James; 117r, Alexander and Eventius; 117r, Finding of the Cross; 118r, John at the Latin Gate; 118r, Appearance of Michael; 119r, Pancras and Companions; 119r, Petronilla; 119r, Ascension; 121v, Pentecost; 128r, John the Baptist; 130v, John and Paul; 131v, Peter and Paul; 138v, Rufina and Secunda; 139r, Praxedes; 139r, Mary Magdalene; 140r, Apollinaris; 141r, Abdon and Sennen; 141r, Chains of Peter; 144v, Sixtus; 145r, Cyriacus and Companions; 145r, Laurence; 145r, Romanus; 148r, Tiburtius and Susanna; 148r, Euplus and Leucius; 148r, Hippolytus; 148r, Eusebius; 148r, Assumption; 151v, Agapitus; 151v, Hermes; 151v, Balbina; 151v, Augustine; 152r, Sabina; 152r, Beheading of John the Baptist; 155v, Nativity of Mary; 156r, Adrian; 160v, Cosmas and Damian; 163r, Antiphons "Ad Benedicite;" 163v, Callistus; 164r, All Saints; 164r, Caesarius and Julian; 167v, Thoedore Tiro; 168r, Martin; 196v, Dedication of St. Peter's Basilica; 170r, Cecilia; 171v, Clement; 172v, Chrysogonus; 173r, Andrew; 173r, Saturninus.
Ff. 175r-183v: Commons. 183v, Dedication of a Church; additional chants (185r, Nicholas; 186r, Blaise; 187r, Benedict; 189v, Valentine; 190r, Sexagesima; 190v, Easter; 190v, George, 190v, Hermes; 191r, Caesarius and Julian); 191r, Funeral Office; 193; Invitatories; 197, Transfiguration.
In the index for this manuscript, the mode field contains alphabetic codes rather than the standard modal numbers. The system of alphabetic codes used for antiphons is different from that used for responsories and their verses. It is therefore important to take note of the two systems and their differences as outlined below. The mode field for antiphons (and their verses) contains the letter-name of the final (the first letter) and then the reciting tone (the second letter) as indicated by the differentia. This follows a method similar to that used by Dyer (1989) for grouping differentiae in this manuscript. The identifiers in this field employ upper- and lowercase characters to distinguish between registers (capital letters representing the lower octave and lower-case, the higher octave), or at least to establish the relation of pitches to the F- and c-clefs of the manuscript. The series of upper-case letters ends on the G above the F-clef, and thus the series of lower-case letters begins on the following a, through the c-clef theoretically to g (g and f are not actually used as reciting tones).

The differentiae in the index are labelled with a letter-number combination; the letter indicates the final pitch of the differentia, and the number is arbitrarily assigned. The order of differentiae given here is independent of that presented by Dyer (1989). The indentifiers in the differentia field also use upper- and lowercase letters to distinguish register.

None of the categories in the mode field has a counterpart with a different registral placement. For example, there is a category CF, but not cf, Cf, or cF. Similarly, none of the modal categories for antiphons has differentiae codes with final notes in different registers. For example, the modal category EE has the differentia cateogry, D1, but not d1.

For responsory verses, there are eight tones. Responds with the four finals-D, E, F, and G-each have a corresponding authentic and plagal tone. The tones found in B. 79 are not the standard Gregorian verse tones, although they all follow melodic courses similar to their Gregorian counterparts. In the index, the first column of the mode field contains the final of the responsory, and the differentia field contains either AU or PL to indicate authentic or plagal.

If a responsory is in transposition, or has a final that seems to contradict that indicated by the verse tone, the theoretical final for the responsory (that is, the untransposed final, or that suggested by the verse tone) is entered into the mode field, for ease in computer sorting. This letter is followed by the actual final as found in the manuscript. Again, upper- and lowercase letters are used to distinguish register. There is one example among the responsories where there might be confusion between two alphabetic codes; both FC and Fc represent transpositions of the F-mode, in the former instance a transposition below and in the latter, above. If the verse of a transposed responsory is also transposed from its conventional register, the code for the responsory is used for the verse. If a verse is not transposed from its conventional register, but has a tone that is inconsistent with the final of the responsory, then the theoretical final of the responsory (suggested by the verse tone) is entered into the first column, and the second column is left blank, as is the case for responsories and verses with conventional finals. In such cases, the responsory and verse will have slightly different codes, since the responsory will have the theoretical final followed by the actual final.

Again, it is important to reiterate that although the codes for antiphons and responsories with unconventional finals look similiar, the letters signify different attributes of the two genres of Office chant. In antiphons the first letter represents the actual final and the second, the reciting tone; in responsories with unconventional finals, the first letter represents the theoretical final and the second, the actual final.

The responsory verse for the feast of John the Baptist, Hic est enim propheta [for the responsory Praecursor domini venit (cao7420)] is set to the conventional Gregorian tone for responsories in mode 8. Nevertheless, the mode and differentia fields for this responsory have been marked in the same way as the other responsories for purposes of computer sorting.

The invitatory tones are numbered in order of their appearance in B. 79. The conventional tone BL, as signified in the CANTUS database, is found in this manuscript and is marked as such. The finals of the invitatory antiphons are entered into their mode fields.

The melody-type codes for antiphons developed by Edward Nowacki for his 1980 dissertation have been entered into the Addendum field. These have only been included for the antiphons written out in full.

Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by “rom.”

Selected Bibliography
An extensive bibliography is given in the facsimile edition of the manuscript:
Baroffio, Bonifacio Giacomo and Kim, Soo Jung. Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Archivio S. Pietro B 79: Antiphonario della Basilica di S. Pietro (Sec. XII). Roma: Edizioni Torre D'Orfeo, 1995. 2 vols (facsimile, commentary and index).
Dyer, Joseph. "The Singing of Psalms in the Early-Medieval Office." Speculum 64 (1989): 535-578.
Nowacki, Edward Charles. "Studies on the Office Antiphons of the Old Roman Manuscripts." Ph. D. dissertation, Brandeis University, 1980. 2 vols.

The computer file was completed by Andrew Mitchell at the University of Western Ontario with editorial assistance from Debra Lacoste.

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Den Haag, Koninklijke Bibliotheek, 70 E 4 Fragmenta Tungrensia

Liturgical compendium from Our Lady’s church in Tongres (Limbourg, Belgium) containing, among other things, several Offices, dating from the 12th to the 14th centuries. 290 x 205 mm.; 117r-121v, 235 x 160 mm. Hufnagelschrift, several hands. 127 folios. In the CANTUS index, only the Offices provided with music are entered.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 75r-80v, Conception of Mary; 81r-86r, Maternus; 86r-96v, Corpus Christi (Festum Eucharistiae; 101r-104v, Bartholomew; 105r-106v, 11,000 Virgin Martyrs (incomplete); 107r-110v, Bernard of Clairvaux; 117r-121v, John before the Latin Gate.
The Office for Corpus Christi was composed by Jean du Mont-Cornillon for the diocese of Liège (1246), but it was used elsewhere as well. The Office of the Conception is found in Analecta hymnica vol. 5, #12 (pp. 47-50). The Maternus Office is found in Analecta hymnica vol. 28, #21 (pp. 61-63) and LMLO -MF31. The Office of Bartholomew is in Analecta hymnica 5, #50 (pp. 148-50) and LMLO-BA81. Most of the chants in this manuscript are not found in CAO.

All chants not found in CAO have been assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by "ton". Any non-CAO chants also found in Tongeren, Onze-Lieve-Vrouw-Kerk, 63 and 64 are given the same identification numbers in the Den Haag file, since these manuscripts all represent the liturgy of the same church. Similarly, the differentia codes used for Den Haag are consistent with those of the Tongres 63 and 64; the differentiae are labelled with a letter-number combination (the letter indicates the final pitch of the differentia, and the number is arbitrarily assigned).

The remaining contents of the manuscript, which are not contained in the index, are as follows:
Ff. 1r-39r, partial martyrologium (Usuardus, O.S.B.); 40r-51v, Necrologium ecclesiae S. Mariae Tongrensis (1 January to 10 April); 52r-63v, lections for Corpus Christi and its octave (attrib. Thomas Aquinas, 14th century); 64r-67r, lections for Barbara with a collecta and incipits for Mass; 67v-71v, Feast of Anna (incomplete), containing items for both Mass and Office; 72r-74v, lections and Mass for Conception (no music); 97r-100v, lections and Mass for Dominic; 111r-115v: Vita beati Francisci abbreviata, divided into lessons for the feast of Francis; 122r-127v, lections for Conception.
Boeren (1988) identified these items. Our Lady’s church in Tongres is as old as the 4th century, the period of Bishop Servatius. A chapter was founded in the 9th century. At the end of the 14th century the famous Radulphus de Rivo became Dean of the chapter, and subsequently carried out many liturgical reforms, necessitating the preparation of new liturgical books. Therefore, although we possess many liturgical manuscripts from the late-14th or early-15th century, most of the older ones do not survive. Den Haag KB 70 E 4 thus contains Our Lady's oldest liturgical documents.

Most of the manuscripts of Our Lady's church are preserved there, including the following: Selected Bibliography
Boeren, P.C. et al. Catalogus van de liturgische handschriften van de Koninklijke Bibliotheek, pp. 6-11. Den Haag: 1988.
Corswarem, P. de. De liturgische boeken der kollegiale kerk van O.L.Vr. van Tongeren voor het Concilie van Trente . Gent: 1923.
Dreves, G.M. ed. Analecta Hymnica Medii Aevi. 55 Volumes. Leipzig: 1886. Reprint. Frankfurt am Main: Minerva, 1961.
Hughes, Andrew. Late Medieval Liturgical Offices: Resources for Electronic Research. Subsidia Mediaevalia. Vol. 23. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1994.

The computer file was prepared by Ike de Loos, with editorial assistance from Andrew Mitchell.

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Einsiedeln, Kloster Einsiedeln - Musikbibliothek, 611

14th-century antiphoner from the monastery of Einsiedeln, Switzerland. Staff notation. Monastic cursus. 281 numbered folios (folio number 139 was skipped; in the invitatory section of the codex the folios numbered 274 and 276-77 are missing; leaves have been interpolated after ff. 106, 137, 146, 245, and 263). No other lacunae.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1-152: Temporale (with some parts of the Sanctorale intermingled). 1r, First Sunday of Advent; 14v, Great "O" Antiphons; 17r, Christmas; 22r, Stephen; 41v, Ferial Office (responsories only); 47r, Septuagesima; 81r, Maundy Thursday; 89r, Easter; 102v, Common of Paschal Saints; 105r, Philip and James; 106v, Finding of the Cross; 108v, Ascension; 117r, Trinity; 119r, Corpus Christi; 123v, Summer Histories; 140r, Sundays after Pentecost; 146w, Ferial Office (antiphons); 151v, Alleluia chants for Eastertide.
Ff. 153-250: Sanctorale. 153r, Andrew; 163v, Meinrad of Einsiedeln; 185r, John the Baptist; 196v, Translation of Benedict; 200r, Mary Magdalene; 205r, Afra; 213v, Assumption; 232v, Gall; 236v, Januarius; 237r, All Saints; 247r, Catherine.
Ff. 251-268r: Common of Saints. Ff. 268v-271v: Dedication of a Church. Ff. 272r-273v: Office for the Dead. Ff. 273v-275v: Invitatories (fragmentary). Ff. 278-281: Various added chants (Scholastica, Benedict, Gregory, Mary Magdalene, Transfiguration).
Einsiedeln 611 records a few examples of an unusual practice of the monks of Einsiedeln, the singing of some chants at Nones, prior to a feast's First Vespers, in anticipation of the days of certain important saints. Such services (consisting of an antiphon or an antiphon with versicle in the manuscript) may be observed for the following feasts: John the Baptist (f. 184v), Peter (f. 189r), Assumption (f. 213v), and All Saints (f. 237r). The fact that such a Nones service is included for the Common of Apostles (f. 251r) may indicate that this practice was more general than only those occasions given specific chants for this service in the manuscript. It is not clear whether these anticipatory Nones services were conflated with or replaced the Nones service of the preceding day.

Some of the unusual Offices in Einsiedeln 611 have been edited in Analecta hymnica and thus appear in Andrew Hughes's Late Medieval Liturgical Offices , including Catherine (Analecta hymnica vol. 26, p. 69, LMLO CB24) and the so-called "Historia nova" for Benedict (Analecta hymnica vol. 25, p. 52, LMLO BE01) that appears here on the feast of his translation. The prose Office for Corpus Christi (often attributed to Thomas Aquinas) was not edited in Analecta hymnica but was copied in LMLO under the siglum XCX. These Offices appear in several other sources in the CANTUS database.

Other saints' Offices have not been edited in Analecta hymnica nor do they appear in LMLO. These include Meinrad, the hermit-founder of Einsiedeln (21 January); Sigismundus, martyred King of Burgundy (1 May); Felix and Regula, martyrs (11 September); and signficant portions of the Office for Maurice and his companions (22 September).

There are only three invitatory tones that are written out in Einsiedeln 611. Presumably there were others on folios now lost. The three tones are those called GR, 5, and 3 in the CANTUS database. For some of the tones represented only by incipit there is little doubt as to their identity: 2, 7, NE, HS, and PA. One tone (beginning DA, GF, GF) seems likely to be BL; another incipit (DA, AC, A) appears to refer both to the tone in general use on Christmas (CH) and to the tone represented as GR in the database.

A final tone seems to be one of those that was written on a leaf now missing from Hartker's antiphoner (St. Gall 390-391); its presence there can be inferred from a copy of Hartker (St. Gall 388) that includes it at the corresponding point in the series. It has been given the siglum HL. St. Gall 388 (and presumably Hartker) assign two antiphons to it, "Regem regum dominum" and "Surgite vigilemus." Einsiedeln 611 assigns the latter of these to the tone called 2 but assigns a second antiphon to this tone, "Ploremus coram domino," for the feast of Mary Magdalene.

The differentiae of each mode have been numbered with a two-digit system: a majuscule letter indicating the final pitch of the differentia and a sequentially ordered numeral. For those differentiae that exist in slightly variant forms, minuscule letters (a-d) have been included in the first extra field after the differentia column to indicate the variation. These extra letters may be found only in the Widescreen version of the index. Chants not found in CAO have been assigned arbitrary numbers beginning with "ein."

Selected Bibliography
Heckenbach, Willibrord. "Das mittelalterlichen Reimoffizium `Praeclarum late' zu den Festen das Heiligen Benedict." In Itinera Domini: Festschrift fuer Emmanuel von Severus OSB zum 80. Geburtstag , 189-210. Muenster: Aschendorff, 1988.
Hughes, Andrew. Late Medieval Liturgical Offices: Resources for Electronic Research. Subsidia Mediaevalia, 23. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1994.
Kjaergaard, Mette R. "CANTUS Inventory and Brief Analysis of an Antiphoner: Einsiedeln Codex 611." M.A. thesis, The University of Western Ontario, 1996.

The computer file was prepared by Mette Kjaergaard (The University of Western Ontario) with editorial assistance from Charles Downey (Catholic University of America).

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Firenze (Florence), Arcivescovado - Biblioteca, s. c.

Twelfth-century antiphoner from Florence Cathedral (Firenze, Italy). Staff notation. Cathedral cursus. 290 folios. Three lacunae.
Liturgical Occasions "at a glance" (refer to the index for complete contents): Ff. 1r-137r: Winter Temporale and Sanctorale. 1r, First Sunday of Advent; 19v, Christmas; 25r, Stephen; lacuna; 48r, Ferial Office; 50r, Antiphons "ad Benedicite"; 66v, Septuagesima; 75v, Responsories "ad Flagellandum;" 76r, Ash Wednesday; 103v, Maundy Thursday; 111v, Easter; 128r, Zenobius; 128v, Ascension; 132v, Pentecost.
Ff. 137v-210r: Summer Sanctorale. 137v, Vitus; 147v, Paul; 150v, Apollinaris; 153v, Donatus; 159r, Laurence; 171v, Nativity of Mary (ff. 175r-176v contain an extra Office not found in CAO); 176v, Exaltation of the Cross; 179r, Michael (incomplete); 180v, Miniatis; 184r, Simon and Jude; 184v, All Saints; 206v, Syrus.
Ff. 210r-231r: Common of Saints (lacuna between folios 217 and 218; 226v-229v, an extra Common of Virgins not found in CAO). Ff. 231r-234r: Dedication of a Church. Ff. 234v-235r: Antiphons "ad Benedicite." Ff. 235r-240r: Sundays after Pentecost. Ff. 240r-257v: Summer Histories. Ff. 258r-261r: Trinity. 261r-226: Office for the Dead. Ff. 266r-273v: Vincent, Exaltation of the Cross, Mary Magdalene, Common of Evangelists. Ff. 273v-275v: Office of the Passion of the Image of Christ. F. 275v, Vincent. Ff. 276r-282r: Tonary. Ff. 282v-290r: Invitatory Tones.
The foliation used in the computer file follows the Arabic numbering found in the upper right-hand corner; these folio numbers are not clearly visible until fol. 10r. Because this is actually the eleventh folio, the second folio is numbered 1w (for recto) and 1x (for verso) in the index. The Common of Saints (ff. 210r-226v) within this manuscript has been bound out of order. Below is their correct sequence:
210r-211v: Common of Evangelists 217r-217v: Common of Evangelists lacuna 214r-215v: Common of Apostles 213r: Common of Apostles 213v: Common of One Martyr 216r-216v: Common of One Martyr 212r-212v: Common of One Martyr 225r-225v: Common of One Martyr 224r-224v: Common of One Confessor 220r-222v: Common of One Confessor 222v-223v: Common of Several Martyrs 219r-219v: Common of Several Martyrs 218r-218v: Common of Several Martyrs 226r: Common of Several Martyrs 226v: Common of Virgins
From 226r to the end, the manuscript appears to be bound in the correct order.

The numbering system for the differentiae follows that of the tonary found on ff. 276r-282r. Each chant not found in CAO is assigned an arbitrary number prefixed by "far".

The computer file was prepared by Keith Glaeske, Charles Downey, and Lila Collamore at The Catholic University of America.

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