C Lee

School of Health Studies


My Software

Horatio is a Windows program that I have written to perform sample size and power estimation in parametric research designs, such as studies involving calculation of a t test, an analysis of variance, a simple correlation or a multiple correlation. This software has a tabbed dialog interface. The user can select the "Means" tab to display a series of questions tailored to tests of the differences among means, or the user can select the "Correlations" tab to display a series of questions tailored to tests of the strength of correlations. Horatio is provided free and "as is" without warranty. You can download and install the current version of Horatio (version 3.1) by clicking here.


My Research

My primary area of research interest is the golden section hypothesis (Benjafield & Adams Webber, 1976) and the associated finding that, on average, persons construe their life experiences to be about 62 percent positive and 38 percent negative. The golden section is an irrational number equal to approximately .618, and it is the ratio between two unequal quantities such that the larger (L) as a proportion of the whole is equal to the smaller (S) as a proportion of the larger (i.e., L/(L+S)= S/L). It is thought that, by construing life experiences to be about 62 percent positive, persons achieve an affective balance in which negative experiences are focal relative to a background of positive experiences.

Benjafield, J., & Adams-Webber, J. (1976). The golden section hypothesis. British Journal of Psychology, 67, 11-15.
Lee, C. J. (1989). Construct polysemy and the virtues of acquaintances. International Journal of Personal Construct Psychology, 2, 377-384.
Lee, C. J. (2006). Affective balance in the construal of activities. Journal of Constructivist Psychology, 19, 343-349.
Lee, C. J., & Adams-Webber, J. (1987). A 'projective' test of the golden section hypothesis. Social Behavior and Personality, 15, 169-175.