LIS 9002

Organization of Information


Relationship to the Goals and Objectives of the MLIS Program

Students who complete this course will be able to:

  1. Organize, describe, and provide access to recorded information in a variety of formats;
  2. Demonstrate an awareness of professional values and standards pertaining to information organization within various information communities;
  3. Critically analyse issues of information organization, and communicate that analysis effectively with others, including users, colleagues, employers and members of the community.

Course Description

Principles and techniques for the organization and representation of information as exemplified in classification and classification schemes, subject representation with controlled vocabularies, and contemporary bibliographic description.

Course Objectives

To develop an understanding of general principles and techniques for the organization and representation of information.

  1. To develop an understanding of general principles and techniques of classification and classification schemes, subject representation with controlled vocabularies, and contemporary bibliographic description.
  2. To develop an ability to communicate the concepts of information organization clearly and effectively to users, colleagues, paraprofessionals and other stakeholders in information communities.

Sample Content (for information only)
  1. Overview of the organization of information
  2. Classification schemes
  3. Dewey Decimal Classification
  4. Library of Congress Classification
  5. Subject representation
  6. Principles and features of:
    • Controlled vocabulary
    • LCSH
    • Thesauri
  7. Bibliographic description
  8. Descriptive cataloguing
  9. ISBD
  10. Access points
  11. Authority control
  12. Encoding standards (MARC)
  13. Management issues and current trends

Sample Readings
  • Gorman, Michael and Pat Oddy. 1997. The Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, Second Edition: their history and principles. In Jean Weihs (ed.) Principles and Future of AACR: Proceedings pp. 158-165.
  • Kornegay, Becky, Heidi Buchanan and Hiddy Morgan. 2005. Amazing, magic searches! Library Journal (130) 13 (November 1): 44-46.
  • Miksa, Francis. 1992. The concept of the universe of knowledge and the purpose of LIS classification. In N.J. Williamson and M. Hudon (eds.) Classification research for knowledge representation and organization. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
  • Taylor, Arlene and Daniel N. Joudrey. 2009. The Organization of Information. 3rd ed. Westport, Conn.: Libraries Unlimited.

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